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LOUIS VUITTON GOES BACK TO A GOLDEN AGE

LOUIS VUITTON GOES BACK TO A GOLDEN AGE
By: null

Abir Achkar//

Paris Fashion Week

Designer Nicolas Ghesquière puts a modern twist on the Belle Époque

Marking the end of a long fashion month, the last word and finale of Spring/Summer 2020 was the Louis Vuitton golden age collection from designer, Nicolas Ghesquière. Celine went ultra-commercial retro for its SS20 runway collection, Hermès presented polished modern work wear and Dior showcased floral femininity. But Ghesquière’s inspiration took us to an uplifting cocktail of Belle Époque opulence, 1970s flair and striking Instagram-friendly handbags.

He took us to the period between the end of the 19th century and the First World War which saw the Eiffel Tower built in Paris, described as ‘a time of enthusiasm and significant change and nostalgia for a time we can only dream about.’

 

The best looks from Louis Vuitton SS2020 and tips on how to wear them

 

A refined, structured silhouette and empowering twist on the classic suit, the gilet is a come-back icon perfect for pairing under your suit to give it that classic modern twist.

The vibrancy and dynamism of one of the most beautiful historical eras in France was epitomized in the art-deco-like style of this colourful, geometric-motif skirt and shoes reminiscent of 19th century Parisian women’s style. You can replace the skirt with a denim or capri.

A classic Gibson top, this immaculate style is perhaps the most true to Ghesquiere’s inspiration at this season’s Louis Vuitton Spring/Summer 2020 presentation. Pair the top and skirt with heels instead to underscore the feminine silhouette for a softer version of a daytime power suit.

 

The Louvre became a portal to the 18th century, where we got aristocratic vibes mixed with modern sporty athleisure.

Creative Director Ghesquière said. “It’s about how some pieces are considered costume, and it was interesting to explore a way of considering them again in a wardrobe that I love. Let’s call it ‘anachronism with a hint of romanticism’.”

    

 

 

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